Challenger GBR301 Home stretch

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Home Stretch. After 3300Nm we finally have Grenada in sight and the crew are elated. Whilst this has been a race and we have not won(!) the scale of the challenge we have completed is not lost on us and as a sail training vessel we are exceptionally proud of what we have accomplished.
People with wildly differing skill levels have come together from all over the world and in just two weeks learned how to operate a boat that 20 years ago was at the cutting edge of performance. Have we reached that edge ourselves? Absolutely not- but the sense of safety this boat inherently generates in the crew when we consider for a second the gulf between what we have been asking it to do and what it is capable of leaves me again happy that Spartan uses just the right boats to share this ocean racing experience with its clients. Looking forward to 2017 we have an excellent plan to negate also the little grey cloud that settles on our ego's when we consider that we are a few days behind our class competition. I'm happy to announce that next year we will bring three more boats on line and due to the collaborative creation of the 'Ocean Class'in 2016, next year many more boats of exactly this type will be returning to the race course after years in the wilderness to rebuild interest and opportunities to sail serious offshore races whatever your skill level. For the RORC Transatlantic Race 2017 we hope to return with up to 8 boats all Volvo 60's and IMOCA 60's all with charter crews on board and all sailing within an agreed set of class guidelines that finally allow these boats to once again compete on a level playing field. Exciting? You bet your ass it is. Watch this space. www.spartanoceanracing.com

For now, the crew are having their last breakfast on board, bags have been packed over night, the boat is impeccably clean and all eyes are on the horizon and the rapidly growing vision of Grenada. Many people over the centuries have completed this crossing before us- a number have arrived before us in the past few days and yet this does not in any way take away from the awesome challenge we have completed personally- Hell's Teeth we have crossed the Atlantic!, we have learned how to be the crew of an ocean going yacht pushing as hard as we could within the bounds of the new skills we have developed and we are proud, we are elated and boy are we looking forward to the ice cold beers the RORC race office even now are loading up into a cart to bring down to the dock for us.
My very great thanks to my wife Kathie back home in Nova Scotia who has provided not only logistical support for the last 3000Nm but also the 5500Nm that preceded this as Challenger made her way to the RORC start line from Canada to the Uk, to France and finally to Lanzarote. My thanks also to Keith Davidson, Daniel Degenais Gaw and Diane Reid my pro crew who have made the last 8500Nm not only possible but fun and safe. They will be going to their own new Spartan steeds in the coming year and I wish them great luck. Finally my thanks to RORC who have once again put on a fantastic race and given us a bucket list experience everyone here will remember for a lifetime.
All good on Challenger. CSM

Day 15 update from Nemesis

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Expedition Nemesis.. Are we getting there!? After 2 weeks of challenging and contrary winds, last night was spent hanging on! Sometimes upside down, until we got the A3 down! Wind oscillating between ene and ese 25 - 30 knots with confused seas reminiscent of wind over tide at St Cats! but much warmer, now preferring the nights as it's so bloody hot during the day.. Hand steering 24/7 as pilot hates these seas! Eaking out the provisions, eat your heart out weight watchers! Guessing we will be the last men standing! Sorry for the wait, we might have made the prize giving if you hadn't moved it from the 15th!! Anyhow Sir Eddie, you've created an iconic race, a Transatlantic expedition!

S.Y Nemesis, day 15, what a lovely sunny day, by late in the day the mainsail gives us shade from the burning heat, that same sail that speeds us on our way! Interesting that in over 2500Nm we have made 2 contacts, yep not much out here, both were well spoken cruisers from home waters, in no real hurry to get west, both interested in our race and lack of crew and impressed by our turn of speed, however more interested in getting a full nights sleep, how different from our sleep deprived race across this vast. There are so many flying fish in this ocean, many are kamikazi fish who impale themselves on the sails, deck fittings and as I found late last night on watch, me, it scared the shit out of me as I thought someone was tapping me on the shoulder! See you on the 14th!!

 

Expedition Nemesis.. Are we getting there!? After 2 weeks of challenging and contrary winds, last night was spent hanging on! Sometimes upside down, until we got the A3 down! Wind oscillating between ene and ese 25 - 30 knots with confused seas reminiscent of wind over tide at St Cats! but much warmer, now preferring the nights as it's so bloody hot during the day.. Hand steering 24/7 as pilot hates these seas! Eaking out the provisions, eat your heart out weight watchers! Guessing we will be the last men standing! Sorry for the wait, we might have made the prize giving if you hadn't moved it from the 15th!! Anyhow Sir Eddie, you've created an iconic race, a Transatlantic expedition!
S.Y Nemesis, day 15, what a lovely sunny day, by late in the day the mainsail gives us shade from the burning heat, that same sail that speeds us on our way! Interesting that in over 2500Nm we have made 2 contacts, yep not much out here, both were well spoken cruisers from home waters, in no real hurry to get west, both interested in our race and lack of crew and impressed by our turn of speed, however more interested in getting a full nights sleep, how different from our sleep deprived race across this vast. There are so many flying fish in this ocean, many are kamaasi fish who impale themselves on the sails, deck fittings and as I found late last night on watch, me, it scared the shit out of me as I thought someone was tapping me on the shoulder! See you on the 14th!!

Campagne de France - FRA147 - Last Day

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

It's just past sunrise on what should be our last day of the RORC Transatlantic Race - 30 miles to the waypoint south of Grenada and a few miles more to the finish. The stunning night was only interrupted by one squall packing 40 knots, and one gybe which also included the usual rearrangement of the interior decor.

Yesterday we made the most of the watermaker, loads of fresh water heated in the sunshine - showers in the cockpit rather than at the back given the waves. Being clean was of course only short-lived. Salty all over again after an alteration with the spinnaker which had been reefed but the zip which holds all the cloth in unzipped itself, effectively turning itself into a masthead sail being flown from a fractional halyard, and therefore dangerously close to the water. If we are flying a reefed sail, it's generally because conditions dictate it, and therefore retrieving the sail intact on deck can be slightly challenging. And wet!

The VHF has just crackled into life for the first time in almost 2 weeks. Reading the Sailing Instructions for the finish procedure is now allowed.

Campagne de France

Campagne de France - FRA147 - Petites occuations

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Campagne de France taille sa route sous une Lune presque pleine et magnifique dans ce qui devrait normalement être la dernière nuit de course de cette RORC Transatlantic.

Petit à petit la Mer s'organise, mais c'est loin d'être encore tout à fait ça et nous avons droit à encore quelques belles plantades dans des talus liquides, occasionnant des arrêts brutaux et des belles gerbes d'eau de chaque côté de l'étrave, qui montent jusqu'aux barres de flèche (il faut dire qu'elles ne sont pas si hautes que ça les barres de flèche sur le gréement Axxon de Campagne de France - à peu près 6 mètres au-dessus de l'eau ).

Durant la course, par pudeur ou par stratégie, on ne parle en général pas de ses petits soucis. D'une part, à moins d'en faire tout un fromage, ça n'intéresse personne, d'autre part on se dit que si les concurrents l'aprenaient, ça pourrait leur remonter le moral. On a beau être bons camarades, quand on est en course on ne pleure pas forcément sur les malheurs des autres, surtout si ça fait nos affaires. C'est comme dans la vie, ça fait jamais bien de le dire, mais on en pense pas moins.

Pour les Terriens qui pensent que l'on risque de s'ennuyer sur un voilier, quand on ne barre pas, quand on ne manoeuvre pas, quand on ne règle pas les voiles, quand on ne fait pas la navigation, quand on ne mange pas, quand on ne dort pas... et accessoirement quand on n'écrit pas des bêtises sur l'ordinateur, qu'ils se rassurent, on a toujours de l'occupation. Il y a toujours de l'imprévu ou des péripéties à gérer.

Ainsi, certains objets du bord, probablement animés d'une âme maléfique, s'évertuent à nous rendre la vie impossible. On pourrait citer plein d'exemples, mais nous ne retiendrons que ceux qui sont les plus nuisibles à la bonne marche du bateau. Celui qui nous a donné le plus de fil à retordre ces derniers jours est un bête zip. Une fermeture éclair, objet pourtant basique que tout le monde utilise plusieurs fois par jour. Mais ce n'est pas n'importe quel zip et celui-ci, hormis qu'il fait plusieurs mètres de long est capital et son disfonctionnement peut avoir des conséquences dramatiques.
Notre spi medium est équipé d'un ris, c'est à dire que quand il est entier nous avons un spi en tête de mât et nous avons la possibilité d'escamoter toute la partie basse pour en faire un très joli petit spi de capelage, voile de brise idéale et très prisée par les temps qui courrent. Lorsque nous prenons le ris, tout le tissu de la partie basse est emprisonné dans un sorte de poche, fermée par ce fameux zip. Le problème est que notre zip a tendance à perdre ses dents comme un boxeur amateur qu'aurait causé mal à Joe Louis sans savoir à qui il s'adressait. Dès qu'il manque une dent c'est un point de faiblesse dans la fermeture et aussitôt tout le zip s'ouvre brutalement, la poche vomissant alors immédiatement le tissu qu'elle contenait. Lequel tissu se retrouvant en train de battre furieusement sous le spi et traînant en grande partie à l'eau. Et à ce moment là, la manoeuve pour récupérer tout ça, affaler le spi et ramenr le tout à bord, si possible en un seul morceau, n'est
pas une mince affaire. D'autant plus que chacun peut imaginer que si on est sous spi de brise, c'est qu'il n'y a pas un vent à laisser les fenètres ouvertes. Pour corser le tout la plage avant est submergée par les embruns, ou même passe à travers les vagues, et la manoeuvre est donc périlleuse. Cela nous est arrivé plusieurs fois, et c'est miracle que nous ayons pu sauver le spi à chaque fois, car Campagne de France aurait très bien pu se retrouver "en pêche", avec un chalut de 150m2 à la traîne. Et en général, quand ça part comme ça, le spi il aime pas. On ramène que des morceaux, justes bons pour alimenter les très nombreuses fabriques de sacs tès mode, façonnés à partir d'authentiques résidus de tissus à voile de bateaux de course.

Une fois que l'on a ramené le tout à bord, il faut repréparer le spi en remettant le ris en place, mais cela suppose une minutieuse vérification du fameux zip et la solution que nous avons trouvée est de mettre un patch de grey tape (bande adhésive grise très costaude) partout où il manque des dents pour renforcer ces points faibles. Tout ça ne se fait pas en 2 minutes, et pendant ce temps là le bateau se dandine sous grand voile seule à vitesse réduite et les petits camarades nous bouffent des milles. Et c'est come ça qu'on se retrouve avec une mauvaise note au pointage d'après.

Le spi à ris c'est une invention géniale, mais déjà en 2011 nous avions ces problèmes de zip et il est navrant que 5 ans après on en soit toujours là. Au lieu de débattre sur les théories du genre ou sexe des anges, il serait peut-être temps qu'on sauve ce qu'il nous reste d'Industrie dans notre pays pour pouvoir fabriquer des bonnes fermeture éclair, sinon on pourra bientôt plus fermer notre braguette sans demander aux Chinois s'ils veulent bien nous concéder, gentiment et au prix qui leur conviendra, un peu de fermeture éclair qui fonctionne.
Les autres objets maléfiques, nous en parlerons ultérieuerement. mais tout ça pour dire que, rassurez vous, nous ne nous ennuyons pas.

A bientôt et si les Dieux le veulent, nous découvrirons demain une nouvelle Terre (en tous cas nouvelle pour nous, car cela fait hélas déjà un moment que la main de l'Homme a été mettre les pieds un peu partout)

Campagne de France - à 150 milles de l'arrivée.

Campagne de France - FRA147 - Samedi Matin

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Bonjour

Normalement, si les vents le permettent et si tout continue de se passer comme il se doit à bord de Campagne de France, arrivée demain à Grenada.

Curieux de découvrir cette île que nous ne connaissons pas. Aussi, même si nous sommes pas mal là où nous sommes, pas mécontents d'arriver non plus, car ce long bord de portant n'est pas de tout repos. En effet, la Mer ne s'est toujours pas vraiment organisée et aussi l'instabilité du vent en force et direction, tout ça réuni fait que c'est un tantinet usant.

Sur Campagne de France, on dose. Evidemment nous essayons de faire marcher le bateau à une vitesse raisonnable, mais le maître mot est surtout "on assure". Comme chacun sait, tant que la ligne n'est pas franchie rien n'est acquis. Et il reste encore 300 milles environ à parcourir avant de la franchir cette ligne. Il peut s'en passer des choses en 300 milles, surtout qu'avec une mer pareille nous ne sommes jamais à l'abri d'un "départ au tas". Se retrouver avec le spi en tenue d'Indien avec 300 milles restant à faire, on risquerait de les trouver longuets ces milles, si nous devions ne plus avoir les voiles qu'il faut. Nous avons déjà expérimenté cela à la Transat Jacques Vabre 2013 où la perte de notre spi medium nous avait coûté un paquet de places. Donc, quand on est bien placé, il vaut mieux parfois ronger un peu son frein plutôt que de faire le cake en torchant de la toile à la recherche d'un chrono qui n'intéresse personne. Il n'y a que le résultat qui compte, et en course il est plus important d'arriver devant les autres que d'aller très vite... de temps en temps.

L'histoire de la course au large nous offre suffisamment d'exemples pour nous rappeler à la raison. Le plus marquant est probablement celui de l'infortuné Steve Ravussin qui a chaviré à 700 milles de l'arrivée de la Route du Rhum 2002, alors qu'il avait course quasiment gagnée avec une avance tellement colossale sur ses poursuivants qu'il lui aurait suffit de finir à un train de Sénateur, sous voilure réduite de convoyage et sans risque, pour s'assurer la victoire. Il doit encore le regretter son excès de zèle et ses rêves de pêter les chronos, car une victoire à la Route du Rhum, ce n'est pas rien dans la vie d'un homme ou d'une femme... Mais le malheur des uns faisant le bonheur des autres c'est Michel Desjoyaux qui a donc gagné en multicoque cette année là, malgré 2 escales techniques, et Helen Mac Arthur qui a franchi la ligne d'arrivée en premier sur son monocoque Kingfisher, franchissant par la même occasion un pas de plus vers son annoblissement futur par la Reine d'An
gleterre et Duchesse de Normandie.

Donc, sur Campagne de France, nous naviguons pour l'instant "à la normande", avec la dose d'audace et de sagesse qui convient à la situation.
Si nous ne sommes pas trop secoués à un moment de la journée, nous en profiterons aussi pour abuser sans compter de notre réserve d'eau douce inépuisable, histoire que les personnes qui seront sous notre vent à l'arrivée, et après aussi, ne soient pas trop incommodées par l'odeur. Par contre il ne faut pas se faire trop d'illusions, car comme après 15 jours de mer nous avons perdu les repères olfactifs terriens, il n'est pas garanti que nous arriverons à nous débarasser totalement d'un certain fumet, que nous ne sentons plus depuis longtemps, mais que nous découvrons en général avec horreur quand nous retournons à bord le lendemain de l'arrivée pour faire le grand nettoyage (vu que le jour de l'arrivée, on ne fait rien d'autre que de se réaclimater, c'est à dire qu'on mange autre chose que du lyophilisé et qu'on boit des bières...).

Campagne de France - 12°14N/56°51W - à 300 milles du but.

Campagne de France - FRA147 - Cumulobeasties

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Cumulobeasties growing out of nowhere in the moonlight. The air is very unstable, wind speed between 18 - 30 knots, sometimes shifting right and putting the boat slightly across the waves. One of these has just rudely landed on the boat and straight on top of me. Luckily the water is warm

We have the equivalent of two thirds of a Fastnet Race left to go to the finish, 400 miles or so, which naturally we won't be able to do in a straight line!

Miranda - Campagne de France

Campagne de France - FRA147 - 600 milles (miles)

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Campagne de France est à moins de 600 milles de la ligne d'arrivée.

Pourquoi est-ce significatif?
Tout simplement parce que lorsque l'on fait des longues courses océaniques on essaye toujours vers l'arrivée de trouver une course que l'on connait bien et que l'on a déjà faite, d'une longueur équivalente au nombre de milles qu'il nous reste  à parcourir, pour se donner une idée de ce qu'il nous reste à faire . Hors, 600 milles, à peu de chose près, correspond à la distance de la célèbre Fastnet Race. Donc, quand on est à 600 milles du but, on se dit toujours "il ne nous reste plus qu'un Fastnet" à faire.

Sauf que ce n'est pas du tout pareil. A quelques bord près, de portant de surcroit, nous sommes presque sur la ligne droite pour finir cette RORC Transatlantic Race. Alors que la Fastnet Race est loin d'être une ligne droite.
En effet, cette course part de Cowes, longe la côte sud anglaise, traverse la Mer Celtique pour aller virer le phare Fastnet situé au large de la pointe sud ouest de l'Irlande, retraverse la Mer d'Irlande, et l'arrivée se juge à Plymouth, frontière entre le Devon et la Cornouaille. Donc peu de chance de faire l'ensemble du parcours entièrement au portant, sauf météo exceptionnelle que l'on attend toujours.

La Fastent Race est certainement la reine de la Course au Large, tout du moins de par son antériorité. La première édition eu lieu en effet en 1929 et fut gagnée par le cotre pilote Jolie Brise. Depuis cette course a lieu immancablement tous les 2 ans, les années impaires. Seules les éditions de 1941 et des quelques années impaires qui suivirent n'eurent pas lieu, on se doute de la raison. Les régatiers avaient autre chose à faire. D'ailleurs, pour l'annecdote, le Fastnet de 1939 fut gagné en temps compensé par le ketch anglais Bloodhund, mais en temps réel par le ketch West Wind mené par un équipage de la Kriegsmarine. Un "vent d'ouest" qui annonçait peut-être une brise à venir de l'Est un peu frisquette. A noter que si vous chercher les résultats du Fastnet sur wikipedia, bizarrement, l'édition de1939 est la seule où le vainqueur en temps réel n'est pas cité, à moins que cela ai été rectifié depuis, mais en tous cas il y a encore 3 ans ce n'était pas le cas...

L'édition de 1979 est restée tristement gravée dans les mémoires, car une dépression soudaine et très creuse s'était abattue sur la flotte en Mer d'Irlande, entraînant de nombreux naufrages et malheureusement la perte de beaucoup de vies humaines. J'ai courru cette édition sur le grand sloop Gauloises 3 et nous avons essuyé la tempête sur le trajet du retour et au portant, donc dans des conditions acceptables, alors que malheureusement se sont les petits bateaux sur l'arrière qui ont ramassé le plus fort du coup de vent. Cette édition dantesque a vu la victoire de Tenacius, mené par Ted Turner.

Comme la Fastnet est une course anglaise et non française, le drame de l'édition 1979 n'a pas remis la course en cause et l'édition de 1981 eut bien lieu, comme il se doit, ne serait-ce qu'en hommage aux 19 victimes. Ceci est d'autant plus logique que chacun s'engage dans une course en prenant ses responsabilités et qu'il appartient à chaque Skipper de prendre la décision, à tout moment, de continuer ou pas une course, selon les circonstances. Il n'y a donc aucune logique à aller chercher des responsables lorsqu'un tel drame arrive et il est bien dommage que l'évolution de certaines sociétés ou pays pousse à aller systématiquement chercher des responsables, encombrant les tribunaux de gens qui n'ont rien à y faire, au lieu de s'occuper de ceux qui mériteraient vraiment de répondre de leurs actes.

2017 est donc une année à Fastnet et Campagne de France doit s'y engager, en espérant y retrouver une nombreuse flotte de Class40.

En attendant, il nous reste "environ un Fastnet" à faire pour finir cette Transat...

Campagne de France, à moins de 600 milles de l'arrivée de la RORC Transat à Grenada.

Campagne de France FRA147 Vendredi Midi

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Bonjour
Cela fait maintenant quelques jours que Campagne de France navigue aux allures portantes, cap, à peu de chose près, sur Grenada.
Même si "théoriquement" les allures portantes c'est mieux que le près, cela dépend tout de même de l'état de la mer et du vent. Depuis cette nuit, nous pouvons de temps en temps enfin confier la barre au pilote automatique, car même si celui-ci se débrouille pas mal du tout il ne faut tout de même pas trop lui en demander et quand la mer est trop abominafreuse il a tout de même du mal.
En tous cas nous on barre mieux et plus vite dans ces conditions et, même si c'est assez pénible de ne pas pouvoir lâcher le guidon, on ne va pas se plaindre car quand les pilotes automatiques barreront tout le temps et dans toutes les conditions mieux que nous et bien je me ferais tout bonnement viré, étant donné que c'est un truc que je sais encore faire pas trop mal sur un bateau. Donc les progrès techniques c'est bien, mais le syndicat des Barreurs surveille quand même ça du coin de l'oeil, histoire de ne pas hôter le pain de la bouche à une population maritime encore précieuse.
Donc la mer n'est pas très bien rangée. Cela doit être du en partie à un très fort courant venant du Sud et qui après avoir longé les côtes du Brésil vient à la rencontre de tout ce qui vient de l'Atlantique nord. Nous constatons aussi un résidu de houle de Sud Est, probablement issu des Alizé de Sud Est, qui sont de l'autre côté du Pot au Noir, donc pas si loin que ça. Cette houle rencontre celle d'Est-Nord Est, typique des Alizé de Nord Est, et cette rencontre, plus le fort courant, engendre un joli bazar, avec une houle croisée et des vagues très abrutes venant de diverses directions. Donc ça secoue fort et tout ça ne donne pas une conjoncture très favorable aux grandes glissades que l'imaginaire associe à la route des Alizés.
Il arrive très fréquemment que les départs aux surf se terminent très brutalement pas un choc frontal dans le talus liquide qui se dresse devant l'étrave. L'arrêt buffet est violent et c'est des coups à se retrouver le nez écrasé sur le pare-brise.
Les déplacements à bord sont très laborieux et il arrive que l'on se prenne des belles valdingues, même si à l'intérieur du bateau nous ne manquons pas de main courantes pour nous accrocher. Donc, si à l'arrivée vous constatez quelques echimoses sur nos corps, n'allez pas en déduire qu'il y a le moindre problème relationel à bord, ce qui est très loin d'être la cas sur Campagne de France.
Pour les manoeuvres sur la plage avant, nous retrouvons la posture naturelle de tout animal digne de ce nom, à savoir que l'on marche aussi sur les pattes de devant et pas seulement sur celles de derrière.
Donc tout cela est un peu fatiguant et cela commence un peu à se ressentir. Mais même si l'arrivée n'est plus très loin, nous sommes toujours dessus à fond, car comme chacun sait, tant que la ligne n'est pas franchie, rien est acquis et tout peut arriver. Même si nous avons une petite avance sur nos concurrents, il reste tout de même un peu de route à faire, durant laquelle il peut encore se passer bien des choses.
A bientôt
Campagne de France - 11°45N/52°26W - cap ouest.

Campagne de France - FRA147 - Mardi 6-12

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Bonjour

Cela fait maintenant quelques jours que Campagne de France navigue aux allures portantes, cap, à peu de chose près, sur Grenada.

Même si "théoriquement" les allures portantes c'est mieux que le près, cela dépend tout de même de l'état de la mer et du vent. Depuis cette nuit, nous pouvons de temps en temps enfin confier la barre au pilote automatique, car même si celui-ci se débrouille pas mal du tout il ne faut tout de même pas trop lui en demander et quand la mer est trop abominafreuse il a tout de même du mal.

En tous cas nous on barre mieux et plus vite dans ces conditions et, même si c'est assez pénible de ne pas pouvoir lâcher le guidon, on ne va pas se plaindre car quand les pilotes automatiques barreront tout le  temps et dans toutes les conditions mieux que nous et bien je me ferais tout bonnement viré, étant donné que c'est un truc que je sais encore faire pas trop mal sur un bateau. Donc les progrès techniques c'est bien, mais le syndicat des Barreurs surveille quand même ça du coin de l'oeil, histoire de ne pas hôter le pain de la bouche à une population maritime encore précieuse.

Donc la mer n'est pas très bien rangée. Cela doit être du en partie à un très fort courant venant du Sud et qui après avoir longé les côtes du Brésil vient à la rencontre de tout ce qui vient de l'Atlantique nord. Nous constatons aussi un résidu de houle de Sud Est, probablement issu des Alizé de Sud Est, qui sont de l'autre côté du Pot au Noir, donc pas si loin que ça. Cette houle rencontre celle d'Est-Nord Est, typique des Alizé de Nord Est, et cette rencontre, plus le fort courant, engendre un joli bazar, avec une houle croisée et des vagues très abrutes venant de diverses directions. Donc ça secoue fort et tout ça ne donne pas une conjoncture très favorable aux grandes glissades que l'imaginaire associe à la route des Alizés.

Il arrive très fréquemment que les départs aux surf se terminent très brutalement pas un choc frontal dans le talus liquide qui se dresse devant l'étrave. L'arrêt buffet est violent et c'est des coups à se retrouver le nez écrasé sur le pare-brise.

Les déplacements à bord sont très laborieux et il arrive que l'on se prenne des belles valdingues, même si à l'intérieur du bateau nous ne manquons pas de main courantes pour nous accrocher. Donc, si à l'arrivée vous constatez quelques echimoses sur nos corps, n'allez pas en déduire qu'il y a le moindre problème relationel à bord, ce qui est très loin d'être la cas sur Campagne de France.

Pour les manoeuvres sur la plage avant, nous retrouvons la posture naturelle de tout animal digne de ce nom, à savoir que l'on marche aussi sur les pattes de devant et pas seulement sur celles de derrière.

Donc tout cela est un peu fatiguant et cela commence un peu à se ressentir. Mais même si l'arrivée n'est plus très loin, nous sommes toujours dessus à fond, car comme chacun sait, tant que la ligne n'est pas franchie, rien est acquis et tout peut arriver. Même si nous avons une petite avance sur nos concurrents, il reste tout de même un peu de route à faire, durant laquelle il peut encore se passer bien des choses.

A bientôt

Campagne de France - 11°45N/52°26W - cap ouest.

 

Maverick - GBR4945R - Day 14

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Dear Team Maverick Fans,

I am sure you have some questions.....

I left you on day 11 with the potential for having to go dead ship. The good news is that we managed to reset the alternator brain and put the spare blades in the hydro-generator. Good news.

Right I am going to talk about the "daisy chain" of events that has led to us being slower than we hoped and really close to losing out to Leopard for Class win. At one stage we thought that this would be reasonably straightforward. This is yacht racing however and nothing is ever easy and while this might be frustrating now it is why we love it.

Event 1. We lost the tack on the A2. This was not our fault, we are still not sure why it failed. The failure is so perfect it could have  been done with scissors. The frustrating thing is I had been saving this kite for this event so it had only been flown a few times in trials and corporates. It had not been used out of range and when we lost it we were not abusing it!

Event 2. We lost the A1.5 The  A1.5 was meant to be a spare to the A2. However it had been used hugely out of its range in the Rolex Giralia Cup race and as a result I elected to used this kite in deliveries etc. It had done a lot more hours but was in good nick. Unfortunately just as a crew member had gone off deck to wake up the next watch we had a wave induced slow down followed by a large wave grabbing the stern and a 25kt gust.This induced a broach that I was not able to stop on the helm. Sean did his best to ease the kite sheet and the main sheet at the same time. One flog and it was all over the kite had a big rip in it. This was the first broach in a long long time and it just coincided with a watch change. Bad luck.

Event 3. Pinch in the (FRO). With the A2 and A1.5 dead we elected to go to our FRO (Fractional Code 0) this deployed fine but after a furl gybe it developed a "pinch"

A "pinch"  is where a furling sail grabs a bit of the sail prematurely and furls one part in the opposite direction to the majority. This means that you cam't get the whole thing to unfurl. We have used this sail a lot and never had this problem. We are not sure why  it has started happening but we mannaged to clear relatively easily the first pinch but had to take the FRO down on the deck to clear a double "pinch" the next time.

Event 4: Missing bowsprit pin. While driving the yacht hard I felt that she was sailing a little bow down. I got Kees to go inspect the crash bulkhead. His first impression was "oh no did not know we had a light in here" The 2 inch stainless pin that attaches the bowsprit to the yacht was somehow missing. We immediately furled the FRO and set about a solution, both to help the structure and secondly to stop the water coming in. We improvised a fix with a winch handle and a shammy.

Event 5. The need for an A2. Unfortunately as I sit here and write this we are not getting the best out of Maverick. We are taking it a bit gingerly on STBD tack but also for the past 48hrs we really have had some small gear up in the sky. She is underpowered. This is massive on this yacht because the step change from being on the foil or not is huge.

So all in all things are good on Maverick. The crew are well  and while my shoreside "to do" list is now as long as a Harrods receipt after a visit by Paris Hilton we are still averaging a little over 10kts VMG. It is going to be very tight with Leopard.

Regardless of the outcome I am very proud of my team. They have all worked incredibly hard in some physically and mentally taxing conditions. This is what makes Ocean Racing unique. It is a marathon and not a sprint. If you cannot keep the yacht together then you will not finish. As they say in order to win, first you need to finish. Maverick has given us some of the best sailing experiences of my life during this race and I will always remember them. By signing up to the RORC Transatlantic Race we knew we would be put against some of the best teams out there. We would not turn up to a knife fight with a gun so to speak. We are going to push hard right to the end. One thing this crossing has shown me is that this yacht with this team will be a force to be reckoned with in future events. Being our first ocean race we will go away and review the performance, work on the reliability and be back for more. Sometimes I forget that  this yacht has only been in the water for seven months...

Olly out

There is only one thing that makes a dream impossible to achieve: the fear of failure.
Paulo Coelho

Campagne de France FRA147 - Thursday Sunset

on . Posted in 2016 Blogs

Apologies for the lack of news. It's been a bit full-on. We are taking it in turns helming the boat in quite a sea state. Big swell from the NE, swell from the SE, plus 1.5 - 2 knots of current flowing NNE, which is not helping. Up to 30 knots at times, in cold sharp downdrafts, whereas the wind the rest of the time is warm and humid. At times, Campagne de France  is at the top of a decent sized ski slope of a wave, accelerating fast down the face and there isn't aways an exit at the bottom of the hill. Spray everywhere, but rarely gets the driver.
The sea got a little more organised before sunset, presumably just to lull us into a false sense of security as night falls!
Numerous flying fish, mostly returned to the sea if they haven't managed to flip-flap there way back to fly another day. Scales everywhere, which is just delightful.
Campagne de France - less than 730 miles to our waypoint south of Grenada