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  • Southern Wind 94, Windfall. Photo: Southern Wind ShipyardThere are 11 days to go until a highly competitive fleet competes in the inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race. The race across the Atlantic will be a very different experience for the crews from 12 different nations taking part. Whatever the size of boat, or whether or not they have crossed the vast Atlantic Ocean before, all have one goal; to make a safe passage and to get to Grenada fast. The race is on!

    High Spirited Russians

    The 94ft (28m) Southern Wind, Windfall will be trying their best to keep up with the largest boat in the fleet, the 100ft (30m) Finot Conq, Nomad IV, and pushing the crew hard all the way across the Atlantic.

    Chartered by passionate Russian sailor, Igor Katalevskiy, some of his High Spirit Sailing Team - a group of Russian friends and sailors - will compete in the RORC Transatlantic Race as the final goal to achieve their Ocean Yacht Master certificate; all part of a special Southern Wind Sailing Academy training program in collaboration with the VMB RYA Training centre that began in Genoa in May and has run throughout the year.

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  • Revving up through the Canary Islands

    Finot Conq maxi 100, Nomad IV, entered into the inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race 2014. Photo: Gilles Martin Raget/Finot Conq

    A varied and international fleet ranging from 40 to 100ft (12.19 to 30.48m) will set off for Grenada on Saturday 29th November from Lanzarote, the most eastern in the Canary Islands chain, in the Royal Ocean Racing Club's new offshore race.

    After a week of preparation and social events hosted at Puerto Calero Marina, the inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race will see competitors from several countries weave their way through the historic archipelago before making landfall 2,800 nautical miles away where they will be welcomed at Camper & Nicholsons' Port Louis Marina.

    Ever since Columbus started the trend over 500 years ago, the Canary Islands have remained the jumping-off point for yachts crossing the Atlantic to the Caribbean. The RORC Transatlantic Race will provide RORC members and other highly competitive race boats with the chance to compete in a top-level event during the east-west transatlantic crossing.

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  • RORC Commodore, Mike Greville, and CEO, Eddie Warden Owen with the trophy Credit: RORC/onEditionPolishing up the silver

    Departing from Puerto Calero, Lanzarote, the first yacht to complete the course and cross the finish line, 2,800 miles later in Grenada, will be presented with an exquisite sterling silver trophy by the International Maxi Association (IMA).

    An equally impressive trophy has been sought for the Overall Winner in IRC by the RORC and John Bowles, a specialist in sporting trophies, certainly came up trumps. The race may be new to the club’s offshore racing calendar, but the magnificent antique sterling silver trophy is far from it.

    Handmade in London in1928 by John Parkes during the heyday of craftsmanship for such trophies, the RORC Transatlantic Race 2014 winner will be privileged to accept the 104 troy-ounce trophy that is beautifully chased with intricate decoration.

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  • Hap Fauth's JV 72, Bella Mente

    The International Maxi Association (IMA) has joined forces with the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) in the organisation of the inaugural RORC Transatlantic Race and will be awarding an exquisite vintage sterling silver trophy to the Line Honours winner.

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